Space, science, mathematics, and a few of my other favorite things.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
This image from Chandra X-Ray Observatory, showing a cluster of galaxies containing an estimated quadrillion (one thousand trillion) times the mass of our sun, is expected to have one of the most violent black holes in the known universe.
Galactic cluster RX J1532 lies about 3.9 billion light-years. It shows brightly in the x-ray spectrum near its center (purple in the image), which means there’s an abundance of hot interstellar gas. This would normally lead to the cooling and coalescing of the gas into the births of trillions of stars, an event called a starburst.
With the help of Chandra, the riddle of why these packets of gas weren’t cooling has been revealed. Two cavities on either side of the black hole of the center galaxy show evidence of supersonic particle jets. The jets, caused by matter falling into the black hole and being flung out violently, create sound waves which rip through the surrounding gas, thus keeping the gas too hot to generate new stars.
The lack of large x-ray emissions from gas falling inwards leads astronomers to think that the black hole may be a rare ‘ultramassive’ version. This would allow the black hole to make the jets without creating many x-rays from too much matter falling inward. The behemoth is expected to clock in at anywhere from 1 to 10 billion solar masses.
[Source]

This image from Chandra X-Ray Observatory, showing a cluster of galaxies containing an estimated quadrillion (one thousand trillion) times the mass of our sun, is expected to have one of the most violent black holes in the known universe.

Galactic cluster RX J1532 lies about 3.9 billion light-years. It shows brightly in the x-ray spectrum near its center (purple in the image), which means there’s an abundance of hot interstellar gas. This would normally lead to the cooling and coalescing of the gas into the births of trillions of stars, an event called a starburst.

With the help of Chandra, the riddle of why these packets of gas weren’t cooling has been revealed. Two cavities on either side of the black hole of the center galaxy show evidence of supersonic particle jets. The jets, caused by matter falling into the black hole and being flung out violently, create sound waves which rip through the surrounding gas, thus keeping the gas too hot to generate new stars.

The lack of large x-ray emissions from gas falling inwards leads astronomers to think that the black hole may be a rare ‘ultramassive’ version. This would allow the black hole to make the jets without creating many x-rays from too much matter falling inward. The behemoth is expected to clock in at anywhere from 1 to 10 billion solar masses.

[Source]